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Basic Notions of Metaphysics: Truth as a Transcendental

In this episode of our going series "Basic Notions of Metaphysics" we inspect the classical definition of truth and its implications which reveal, as usual, the proverbial "more than meets the eye" dimension of something seemingly quite pedestrian.

So let us take a look back into our Medieval and classical past and explicate what is implicit in the notion of the truth as transcendental.

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Coronation of Democracy pt.2

In the second part of his take on current crisis, which is now apparently fading out into something repeatedly named "new normalcy", Mihai addresses the wider issue at stake: the technocratic, automatic, reaction it provoked and its implications for every day life. Technical approach is conditioned by its inherently limiting nature which necessarily produces a reduction of plentitude of the real to isolated aspects of it, that can ultimately be controlled or, at least, be confined into controllable context. While this may be a sound approach for the specialist, dealing with special problem, it certainly becomes ominous when it takes on metaphysical reach. The ensuing result can be understood in terms of the rejection of hierarchy of reality, which Mihai exemplifies with examples from everyday life both of individual and the society at large.

Also, as a bonus you get some weight loss advice (no fat shaming implied).

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Coronation of Democracy pt.1

It had to happen. Until now we managed to avoid giving our account on global pandemic, without giving away the depth of our heresy at the same time; to wit, that we actually do not belong to overwhelming majority that knows absolutely everything there is to know about it. Yet as not knowing anything is as impossible as knowing everything, Mihai Marinescu volunteered to give his survey of the social effect of the lockdown in his country and to point out some rather ominous symptoms of the political and social shifts it could produce in the future. 

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Back Roads to Philosophy: Introduction to Immanuel Kant’s Kritik der Reinen Vernunft pt. 1

We start our Back Roads to Philosophy series with the first episode on Kant's Kritik der Reinen Vernunft. At this point we provide general introduction to the intention around which this exemplar of modern metaphysics has been formed. We stick to selected passages from the "Preface" and "Preface to Second Edition" as well as the "Introduction to First Edition", and we lay out why Kant's motivation is fundamentally to make an attempt at the new beginning in metaphysics; we explain the significance of some of the metaphors he is prone to use and give definitions of some of the basic terms. Finally, we talk about the structure of the Kritik and why and how, for Kant, it reflects the intrinsic structure of the very human faculty it is intended to analyze - pure mind itself.

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Back Roads to Philosophy: Introduction

Hereby we present new series of videos/webinars in history of philosophy. As we explain at length in introductory video, this will be as much as possible impartial exposition of passages from important philosophers, with minimum criticism, starting from modern age and then moving towards the past - hence "back road"; in the upcoming episodes we'll deal with Immanuel Kant's Kritik der Reinen Vernunft, a premier work of modern metaphysics. In introduction we give preliminary explanation why our way backwards in philosophy starts with him.

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An Incommunicable Given, Pt. 1

It is often said that dignity of person is in itself the greatest moral "given"; that person is "a purpose unto itself" (Kant); that it is inviolable "given" of humanity. And so on and so forth, from the popular moralizing to the real basis of legislature, this perpetually used, yet rarely pondered upon notion strikes us as something that should be the most comprehensible and closest thing to our minds, but, on closer inspection, it is hard to be sure where it really stems from and how we came to understand it as a self evident "given". In this two parts essay we'll inquire about the origin of this "given" in the singular event in history when, quite literary, the "given" was handed to us, while employing help of our regular assortment of traditional authorities. In the first part we treat metaphysics that can prepare the mind for the approach to the heart of the matter, beyond the subject/object split, but that can nevertheless take us only one part of the way. Also we juxtapose the traditional understanding of the relationship of intellect and being against Immanuel Kant's idea of "transcendental philosophy", which could be understood as an epitome of all attacks on metaphysics, by metaphysics, in modernity.

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Times of Absence

We have often pointed out the peculiar quality of the present day: praise of the modern ideals of humanist values, economical growth - sustainable or otherwise - human rights and scientific achievement are repeated ad nauseam, yet there's a strange atmosphere of vacuity about them that for the most people's sentiments was not as obvious in the final decades of 20th Century.

We posit that reason for this may just be that those ideals do not exist any more in any meaningful way.

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Enjoy the Silence

The combination of viral and virtual pandemic yields some still largely unnoticed benefits. In this podcast we'll point out the pronounced absence of, up to only a week or two ago, omnipresent forces - one is the European Union and the other is perpetual terror of NGOs and media peddling acidic ideological trash. Both of them have been present for one or more decades, depending on the country in question, and now, in the matter of days or even hours, they are simply suspended from the existence.


While stating the benefits and educational potential of the situation, we'll provide some explanations of why this came to pass.

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Casual Malificence

On principle we don't speculate about the obvious crisis de jour. But, then again, why let the good crisis go to waste? In her short, but poignant, reflection on the reaction of a doomsday cultist, whose cult lost the undue attention it had literary over night, Deirdre makes the point we should keep in mind.