Tagged: Friedrich Nietzsche

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Nihilism Forecast: Monument Bashing and the Eternal Recurrence of the Same

"Prevalently destructive with periods of tedium". That's the the standard forecast of Kali Tribune's Nihilism, Genocide and Bad Language Forecast Authority. Yet, if we observe the mania of erasing the past by means of sledge hammer in USA and UK, that is: of erasing every possible moral wart from the face of the past, we have to speculate on possibility of radical nihilism change in future; the one nominally coming from the political right. To this effect we employ the most radical modern idea of affirming the past to an extent that absolutely no conceivable cruelty is to be rejected but embraced as one's own most intimate possession. To this effect we employ the most radical modern idea of affirming the past to an extent that absolutely no conceivable cruelty is to be rejected but embraced as one's own most intimate possession. We are talking about the idea of the eternal recurrence of the same as envisioned by Friedrich Nietzsche; in some sense the polar, yet strangely congenial, opposite of the principle that's driving the destructive movements from the radical left. If anyone is posing a question how radical could be reaction from the Right to the amok of the Left in the USA and Western Europe, in this podcast we provide you, via Nietzsche, with an image of The Radical.

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Ad Barbaris

We interrupt the practice of publishing exclusively our original content and nick the extract from the book length series of interviews Cardinal Robert Sarah gave to French author Nicholas Diat. Although, in religious matters, we rarely address the problems of contemporary Church directly, prefering instead to bring out the positive content of Christian Tradition and simultaneously address the proverbial signs of the times as we see them in accordance with our mainly philosophical expertise, this time around we cannot pass on the opportunity to express admiration for a man who does both of these things with clarity that we would be hard pressed to match, even from our comfortable, marginal, position of much freedom and zero influence. As the text is multilayered and at few points Cardinal's wording is especially succint in addressing some of the ills we've been writing of at length, readers can expect commentary to follow.