Tagged: nihilism

1

No Means No

In this podcast we consider what it means to root the understanding of man as zoon politikon in pure negation, taking few cues from what is now widely called - and slurred - 'Liberalism' as opposed to 'collectivism'. We explain the congeniality of individualism and collectivism based on negation and the materialist reduction ranging from the one ending up in the "free individual opinion" to "ethnic groups" based on race; we argue that contemporary "identity politics" - from "woke racism" that is currently the order of the day to "white nationalism - stem from the same root of pure negativity.

9

Nihilism Forecast: Monument Bashing and the Eternal Recurrence of the Same

"Prevalently destructive with periods of tedium". That's the the standard forecast of Kali Tribune's Nihilism, Genocide and Bad Language Forecast Authority. Yet, if we observe the mania of erasing the past by means of sledge hammer in USA and UK, that is: of erasing every possible moral wart from the face of the past, we have to speculate on possibility of radical nihilism change in future; the one nominally coming from the political right. To this effect we employ the most radical modern idea of affirming the past to an extent that absolutely no conceivable cruelty is to be rejected but embraced as one's own most intimate possession. To this effect we employ the most radical modern idea of affirming the past to an extent that absolutely no conceivable cruelty is to be rejected but embraced as one's own most intimate possession. We are talking about the idea of the eternal recurrence of the same as envisioned by Friedrich Nietzsche; in some sense the polar, yet strangely congenial, opposite of the principle that's driving the destructive movements from the radical left. If anyone is posing a question how radical could be reaction from the Right to the amok of the Left in the USA and Western Europe, in this podcast we provide you, via Nietzsche, with an image of The Radical.

2

Righteous Beyond Redemption

The specter is haunting the world, the specter of self righteousness. In this podcast we address three forms of self-deceit by which masses succeed at inducing and maintaining the psychotic illusion of "righteous indignation" in themselves. We treat the primacy of negative freedom, violent dissolution of historical origins and secularized idea of divine justice as congenial underlying principles that play out in partly virtual, partly real theater of the riots shaking American and British cities and try to answer the only really important question:

how masses of humanity can progressively melt into a pile of moral excrement and simultaneously attempt to turn the world into their own mirror without causing single individual among their number to vomit.

5

Times of Absence

We have often pointed out the peculiar quality of the present day: praise of the modern ideals of humanist values, economical growth - sustainable or otherwise - human rights and scientific achievement are repeated ad nauseam, yet there's a strange atmosphere of vacuity about them that for the most people's sentiments was not as obvious in the final decades of 20th Century.

We posit that reason for this may just be that those ideals do not exist any more in any meaningful way.

0

Atoms’n’Void Blues: The Heartaches of a Materialist

Materialism is not only a mentality or metaphysical orientation. It is also an ontological mood - the peculiar sense of the world and oneself that is highly personal yet at the same time it imbibes all the metaphysical propositions of materialist with rather well defined pathology. This pathology, we claim is the source and the purpose of materialist metaphysics and materialist life, while the systemic form it builds for itself, be it Communism, scientism or something entirely different is quite secondary. To explain what we mean, we focus on the statements of one old fashioned dialectical materialist: Slavoj Žižek, wherein he explains his worldview. 

4

Autopsies

In this podcast we address once more the superficiality of intellectual content mediated on Internet and aptness of this medium for rejecting the depth of knowledge, while providing an illusion of its presence - something we, some time ago, expressed in Plato's term of "shadow drawing" or skiagraphia.

6

Running on Empty: Nihilism of Contemporary Workplace

A perennial issue dealt with by KT Department of Metaphysics, Nihilism and Melancholia is what we dubbed the "dissolution of the past". This process runs in the background of the diverse subjects and unifies the social ills we address every now and then. It can also - and quite precisely - be pinpointed as the dissolution of the roots in all facets of human life. In this podcast we'll talk about one aspect of daily life which discloses it for the eyes of more or less everybody endowed with even modest sense of normalcy: a changing pattern of human work and its ever increasing instability pointing to the the total dissolution of what once were professions or vocations into a quagmire of increasingly abstract "jobs" that one is expected to change on yearly or even monthly basis.

6

Luminar Podcast: On Forgetting Fairytales

Deirdre informs us about yet another ongoing attempt to deprive human beings of human form, in this case at the youngest age. Taber school in Barcelona, removing fairytales and books from young children's bookshelves, and no doubt to be followed by other schools doing likewise, is a deeply ideological act, and part of a wider process of historical revisionism that infantilises us all.

0

Ad Barbaris

We interrupt the practice of publishing exclusively our original content and nick the extract from the book length series of interviews Cardinal Robert Sarah gave to French author Nicholas Diat. Although, in religious matters, we rarely address the problems of contemporary Church directly, prefering instead to bring out the positive content of Christian Tradition and simultaneously address the proverbial signs of the times as we see them in accordance with our mainly philosophical expertise, this time around we cannot pass on the opportunity to express admiration for a man who does both of these things with clarity that we would be hard pressed to match, even from our comfortable, marginal, position of much freedom and zero influence. As the text is multilayered and at few points Cardinal's wording is especially succint in addressing some of the ills we've been writing of at length, readers can expect commentary to follow.